Homeland Security did a massive buildup of personnel and military style equipment starting in 2002. However, the looming question today is why did other federal civilian government agencies militarize? Up to 67 civilian general and administrative federal agencies armed up with a cost during 2014 of reaching $1.48 billion dollars.

SEE: Militarization of Deep State: Part 1 Homeland Security

The Coburn-Obama bill or the “Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006” was signed into law by President George W. Bush, illuminating a light on civilian government agency expenditures. Senator Tom Coburn was quoted as saying—“Is the spending in the public interest or the special interest?” and Senator Barack Obama was quoted as saying —“I know that restoring transparency is not only the surest way to achieve results, but also to earn back the trust in government…”  

It is quite odd that in 2008 when Barack Obama was running for President he decided to make a very chilling statement in contrast to what he an Senator Cotton’s Bill was all about, a statement that can make one turn pale with great concern and dread:

“We cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we set; we’ve got to have a civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well funded”

All of this leads this U.S. Air Force retiree of 20 years to surmise the following opinion. Remember how Obama outlined in his presidential campaign speech for a civilian national security force during 2008? It appears Obama’s goal was meant to build a new force as strong as the U.S. Military due to the cumbersome restrictions of using the U.S. military within the United States, pursuant to Posse Comitatus.

The military was robbed of billions of dollars during Obama’s tenure as President, no doubt to help pay for a “civilian national security force” through Sequestration. The shortfall in funds for our military makes the United States weaker militarily and more vulnerable to a multilateral massive attack.

What should be done with these civilian federal agencies is to disarm them as soon as possible, turning the equipment and arms over to various state law enforcement agencies. Recently, President Trump signed an order to begin again giving military style equipment to police agencies that Obama had restricted and curtailed 2 years ago.

Below are some of the known civilian federal agencies from years back that have bought military style equipment and ammunition published by “Open The Books” in 2006 —

  • Non-military federal spending on guns and ammunition jumped 104 percent from $55 million (FY2006) to $112 million (FY2011).
  • Administrative agencies including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Small Business Administration (SBA), Smithsonian Institution, Social Security Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, United States Mint, Department of Education, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and many other agencies purchased guns, ammo, and military-style equipment.
  • The Internal Revenue Service, with its 2,316 special agents, spent nearly $11 million on guns, ammunition and military-style equipment.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spent $3.1 million on guns, ammunition and military-style equipment. The EPA has spent $715 million on its ‘Criminal Enforcement Division’ from FY2005 to present even as the agency has come under fire for failing to perform its basic functions.
  • The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) spent $11.66 million including more than $200,000 on ‘night vision equipment,’ $2.3 million on ‘armor – personal,’ more than $2 million on guns, and $3.6 million on ammunition. Veterans Affairs has 3,700 law enforcement officers guarding and securing VA medical centers.
  • The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service spent $4.77 million purchasing shotguns, 308 caliber rifles, night vision goggles, propane cannons, liquid explosives, pyro supplies, buckshot, LP gas cannons, drones, remote controlled helicopters, thermal cameras, military waterproof thermal infrared scopes, and more.

SEE: Militarization of Deep State: Part 1 Homeland Security


Petition on We the People!

We have 30 days to get 99,999 signatures in order for petition to be reviewed by the White House. https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/militarization-civilian-non-combative-federal-agencies

Here are a few tips to help promote the petition and get to 99,999 signatures:

1. Email: Email the petition to your friends, family and others who care about this issue.

2. Facebook: Post your petition to your Facebook wall to let folks know about it. Here’s a sample message you can cut and paste into your Facebook status:

We just started a petition on the White House petitions site, We the People. Will you sign it? https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/militarization-civilian-non-combative-federal-agencies

3. Twitter: Tweet about your petition. Here’s a sample tweet you can use:

We just started a petition on the White House Petitions site, We the People. Will you sign it? https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/militarization-civilian-non-combative-federal-agencies

(click on images to enlarge)




Phil Davis served in the USAF from 1973-1993 and most of it was working in Command and Control at Strategic Air Command (SAC) and United States Air Forces Europe USAFE, while his two best assignments was working at HQ 8AF Command Center from 1984-1989 at Barksdale AFB, with a one year assignment serving with the 485 Tactical Missile Wing, Ground Launch Cruise Missiles in Belgium during 1986-1987. Phil has been writing on political issues since 1993, including a run with the Examiner prior to 2013. It was just after that when he started his own blog where he has written on various subjects about a myriad of topics related to our country's political environment and the rediscovery of American Patriotism.

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